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Frequency of Office Visits

The closer you get to your due date, the more frequently your

healthcare provider will need to see you. Through your sixth

month, appointments will be scheduled every 4 weeks. Then,

plan to go to the office every 2 weeks during the seventh and

eighth months and every week during that last important month.

These visits will take less time than your initial exam but are just as

important to make sure your pregnancy is progressing well.

Discuss Your Stresses

If you have special circumstances like single motherhood or if you

are considering adoption alternatives, talk about these issues at

your initial appointment. Your healthcare provider may be able to

help with suggestions and references.

By being open and honest

with your healthcare provider, they will be able to better help you,

and you should have fewer problems during your pregnancy.

Choosing a Pediatrician

By the time you complete your hospital pre-admission form, you should have selected a pediatrician who will see your

baby in the nursery and will be your baby’s provider after you leave the hospital. Your pediatrician’s full name, address

and telephone number must be submitted as part of the pre-admission information. Choosing a pediatrician is a very

important decision since this is the person who will be caring for your child.

This person will also be giving you advice about many issues regarding your baby’s health. If a different physician

will be checking your baby in the hospital, bring that information along as well. It is important to make sure that the

healthcare provider is on your list of “providers,” if you have an insurance plan that has a preferred provider list. If you

have Medicaid, your caseworker or the Health Department can give you a list of healthcare providers.

The following list contains questions you might want to ask as you interview for a pediatrician or healthcare provider:

• What hospital do you use?

• Can you describe your care plans for my baby during

the first year?

• How do you feel about breastfeeding?

• What is your opinion on circumcision?

• What pamphlets and reading materials does your

office supply regarding care for my baby?

• If you are a partner in a group practice, do other

members of the group share your philosophy?

• What arrangements are made for emergency

treatments during and after office hours?

• What arrangements are made to return phone calls

during the weekday, weekend and after hours?

• What are your fees for a scheduled routine visit and

follow-up visit?

• When do I introduce my baby to solid foods?

• How soon will you see my baby after birth?

• How do you feel about prescribing medication over

the phone?

• Do you use nurse practitioners or lactation consultants?

After the interview, spend some time with your partner thinking about the visit. Were your questions answered and did

you establish a relationship that made you comfortable with that healthcare provider? Remember, the pediatrician you

choose is being entrusted to care for the physical and emotional well-being of your child for at least the next 18 years.

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Prenatal Care